Faster & Better: Pick Up Your Songwriting Speed

We all want to be more creative, have more songs in the catalog, and feel satisfied that we’re getting things accomplished. It’s just that reality doesn’t always work out that way. More often than not…

  • We don’t have any good ideas for new songs.
  • We’re not sure what kinds of songs we should be writing and for what market.
  • We get stuck working on one song that’s in trouble.
  • We’re scared our songs aren’t good enough so we don’t finish them.

We all know that good quality has to be maintained, but I bet you could write more songs and keep the quality at the level you want or even improve it. Here are a whole bunch of ideas for writing FASTER and BETTER.

The quickest way to get started.STUDY SUCCESSFUL SONGS
This is the quickest way to solve a lot of the problems I just listed. Spend at least one to two hours per week listening to songs on the music charts, or songs used in Film & TV. Of course, you won’t like everything you hear. You may have to dig a while before you uncover a song you want to learn from. But it’s worth it and it’s an essential part of the job of songwriting.

Too often we think of our songwriting career as ONLY the act of songwriting, but there’s so much more. Laying the groundwork for new songs, learning how others creatively use song craft, getting inspired, feeling like you could beat those songs – all of these are ways you can up your game. Get your ears used to hearing what’s successful out there and your songwriting will improve.

READ THIS: Here’s an article on my website with a list of resources where you can find successful artists and bands in a range of styles to listen to.

Embed current songs to give yourself an instant feel for the style
When you find a song you like, get a copy of the lyrics. (you can find them online or take them down by ear.) Practice singing along with the track until it’s comfortable for you. This may not be as easy as it sounds. Many current singer-songwriter songs have complex melodies and phrasing. Just learn it one section at a time. If the song isn’t in your vocal range, talk-sing along with it until you get a feel for the rhythm of the melody. These days, the rhythm of the notes is as important as note pitches.  Continue reading “Faster & Better: Pick Up Your Songwriting Speed”

Music Producers: What They Do and How to Find One

If you’re an artist or band making an Indie CD or EP, or a songwriter recording a master to pitch to film and TV, there’s a good chance you’re thinking about hiring that magical, mystical creature called “The Music Producer.”

So… how does that work? What does a music producer do? How do you know if you’ve found the right one? Where do you find one? Let’s begin with the most basic question and go from there.

What do you want from a producer?

Start by asking what it is you want a producer to do for you. There’s probably a range of things. Among them, maybe you want a producer to…

  • Help you define your style and find your genre
  • Make your song sound like a hit
  • Co-write a hit song with you
  • Advise you on the music business
  • Walk your song into a record label, publisher, or music supervisor when it’s done

Is this realistic? Is there any producer who can really do these things for you? Probably not, at least not now. A producer can add to your effort but cannot replace a solid foundation, laid down by you, before you ever start looking. Without that foundation, there’s no way to know what kind of producer you’re looking for.

 Lay your foundation

There are several things you should do before you start the hunt for a producer. Unfortunately, too often we hope that someone else will do them for us. But these are a crucial part of your job as a songwriter or artist.

➤ 1. Know your market and audience

Who will you be playing these songs for? Will you be pitching them to a music publisher for established artists? Pitching to film and TV? To a label as an artist? Are you building up your fan base on YouTube? Selling this CD or EP at live gigs?

Of course, you could be doing all of these, but one or two will be more important than the rest. Think about that audience and what appeals to them right now. Make a list of  artists or bands that are successful in those markets. Continue reading “Music Producers: What They Do and How to Find One”

Break Through to Songwriting Success

Seems I’ve heard from a lot of songwriters and composers lately who are feeling frustrated.  Their careers haven’t gotten off the ground or they’re stalled at a level that isn’t really satisfying. Over and over, I hear things like…

frustrated-songwriter

  • I’m not getting the kind of response from the music industry I deserve.
  • I spend hours on my music but I’m not making any money.
  • They keep telling me my music is dated.
  • I’m doing the best I can. I guess I just don’t have enough talent.

I know how awful it feels to be in that place. But there’s really a very straightforward process for getting beyond these problems. It takes focus, determination, and effort. But If you’re willing to do that then you can get where you want to go.

So let’s cut to the chase… Everything you need to know to be a successful songwriter is right in front of you. If you study successful songs and instrumentals and use them to help you discover new techniques and choices to use in your own songs, you’ll break through.

Once you know what’s working for today’s listeners and the music industry and you can create original, authentic material in one of these styles, you’ll find you have an open door into the offices of music publishers and Film/TV music supervisors. They need this music and you’d be surprised how many ways there are to get it to them. But you need to have the goods first, before you approach them. Continue reading “Break Through to Songwriting Success”

Raw Sound for a Slick TV Commercial

Dior J'Adore ad

Here’s a luxury perfume commercial (Dior) using a song with a raw Indie vibe. The song is “Heavy Cross” by  three-piece Rock band Gossip. Listen to the song and notice how the electric guitar is used to create contrast between sections and drive the beat. The drums back up the guitar in a tight arrangement that adds plenty of punch. No big synthesizer string sections, no horns, no orchestra banging in and out, It’s just raw, good-ol’ Rock energy.

Watch the commercial on YouTube.

The vocal
The band’s singer, Beth Ditto, delivers attitude and power and she has a solid sense of pitch. You could record an edgy Rock song like this with either a male or female vocal. The singer’s personality and energy level will need to match the track, but pitch may not be such a big issue. Think of the Talking Heads’ “Remain in Light” album. There’s a lot of that influence here, especially in the guitar tracks. David Byrne’s vocals are expressive and full of character and energy; vocal pitch is definitely secondary.

Instrumental pitches
You could pitch a track like this as an instrumental and it would be a great match for many Continue reading “Raw Sound for a Slick TV Commercial”